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Road trips are all about freedom, adventure and new perspectives, with a bit of nostalgia and fried food thrown in. Although we can now look up the answer to a trivia question rather than feuding about it for 35 miles, stowing away the screens and staring out the window can take us back to simpler times and deeper conversations.

What is it about the magic of the open road? Is it the lure of the unknown, the highway’s yellow Morse code unspooling in the distance like Dorothy’s way to Oz? Is it the promise of exploring places we’ve never been, of lighting out for the territories and leaving our everyday selves behind? Or is it the joy of following a well-trodden path, of reassuring ourselves that this once-loved general store, goofy road sign or gnarled apple orchard has continued

  • Words:
    Stephanie Rosenbaum Klassen
  • Photography:
    Neil Bedford
  • Styling:
    Rachel Caulfield

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  • Words:
    Stephanie Rosenbaum Klassen
  • Photography:
    Neil Bedford
  • Styling:
    Rachel Caulfield
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