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Marcel Duchamp made artwork, but he also played chess. So ardently did he pursue the latter—joining a prestigious chess club in Paris, competing in national tournaments—that his admirers might wonder whether he was truly happy as an artist.

It seems Duchamp asked himself the same question. In 1920, after threatening to abandon the art world and study chess full time, he wrote, “Naturally this is the part of my life that I enjoy most.” His love of chess is evident in his work: The figures in The Large Glass recall rooks arranged carefully on a board. Duchamp wished to fuse art and chess. The popular opinion, espoused by historians, proposes that Duchamp saw the art world as a

  • Words:
    Jared Killeen
  • Photography:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Set Design:
    Maya Angeli and Aliki Kirmitsi

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  • Words:
    Jared Killeen
  • Photography:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Set Design:
    Maya Angeli and Aliki Kirmitsi
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