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In a seemingly endless variety of shapes, sizes and patterns, holes add eye-catching elements to architecture and design while providing functionality by screening light, filtering sound, increasing weather resistance and improving energy efficiency.

Pettersen and Hein’s mirror sculpture (top) punctures ideas about art and design—literally and figuratively— by transforming everyday materials and objects into something more unexpected. The clock designed by Birgitte Due Madsen and Jonas Trampedach (center) features hexagonal patterns that allow even numbers to be easily identified. The holes in HAY’s punched organizer (bottom) create a sense of uniformity and inspire tidier desks at the office and at home.

  • Words:
    Molly Mandell
  • Photography:
    Mikkel Mortensen
  • Prop styling:
    Atelier CPH

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  • Words:
    Molly Mandell
  • Photography:
    Mikkel Mortensen
  • Prop styling:
    Atelier CPH
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