• No products in the cart.
cart chevron-down close-disc
:

For one photographer, an unusual concern: how to create images that are not too beautiful.

Julia Hetta describes herself as a romantic. She appreciates beauty and says she falls for it easily. It seems a fortunate disposition for a photographer, but Hetta, being Swedish, also observes lagom—the concept of “just the right amount.”

In Hetta’s photographs, subjects that are obviously beautiful—flowers, fashion models—are subsequently tempered by items a touch more grotesque. For example, she managed to slip two pints of milk and a tin of sardines into an advertising campaign for Anya Hindmarch and a sheep’s skull into a commission for Le Bon Marché.

  • Words:
    John Clifford Burns
  • Photography:
    Julie Hetta

This story appears in a print issue of Kinfolk. You’re welcome to read three stories from each print issue of Kinfolk for free. To continue reading this story, click here.

If you'd like to enjoy unlimited access to our online archive, subscribe here. If you’re already a subscriber, please sign in.

Alternatively, keep browsing Kinfolk.com to enjoy more free content.

  • Words:
    John Clifford Burns
  • Photography:
    Julie Hetta
Related Stories
kinfolk_vol22_byredo_ft

Ben Gorham’s nose is big business. By following it, he’s expanded his fragrance brand Byredo into a global empire.

kinfolk_vol21_amysall_ft

Amy Sall reflects on her Senegalese heritage and how its physical reminders shepherd her sense of home—wherever she may be.

kinfolk_vol17_leanonme_ft

Respect, admiration and trust are qualities that we look for in compatriots. The spark arising when two people bond can be unexpected and exciting.