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Jacques Henri Lartigue was a wealthy bon vivant whose photography was guided by the pleasure principle.

With his camera, Lartigue doted on the somatic beauty of French summers—the sporting life, fast cars and the splash of swimmers at play. Strange, then, that the world has so long neglected his work in color. Perhaps it’s a remnant of midcentury photography’s black-and-white orthodoxy, which Lartigue merrily defied. Contemplating an orange in a letter to Anaïs Nin, for example, he once wrote, “It’s about showing that it shines in the sun […] that it’s not a dead object.” Lartigue:

  • Words:
    Asher Ross
  • Photography:
    Jacques Henri Lartigue ©Ministère de la Culture - France / AAJHL

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  • Words:
    Asher Ross
  • Photography:
    Jacques Henri Lartigue ©Ministère de la Culture - France / AAJHL
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