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If good things come to those who wait, what happens to those who keep others waiting? A slightly overdue defense of procrastination.

The irony of this essay is implicit in its subject: Not only did I procrastinate before writing it, but everyone reading this essay—with the exception of my editor—is procrastinating by reading it. There is something better you should be doing. By something “better” I mean something utilitarian: paying bills, finishing homework, cleaning dirty windows, getting a colonoscopy, etc. From this claim arises several assumptions:

First, we only procrastinate that which is both painful and necessary; we wouldn’t procrastinate throwing ourselves on a hot spike because we would never do so. Unless hot-spiking was for pleasurable ends, in which case we wouldn’t procrastinate.

  • Words:
    Micah Nathan
  • Photography:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Set Design:
    Maya Angeli and Aliki Kirmitsi

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  • Words:
    Micah Nathan
  • Photography:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Set Design:
    Maya Angeli and Aliki Kirmitsi
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