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Laura Waddell pays homage to Anaïs Nin: the erotic novelist who awoke desires in generations of young women—and became the patron saint of social media over-sharers.

When choosing a subject for my high school English dissertation, it was with glee that I paired Anaïs Nin’s Delta of Venus with D.H. Lawrence’s Women in Love, intent on shocking by writing on literary eroticism. I’d been put onto Women in Love by a gay friend a couple of years older. On a day we played hooky from school, he showed me the well-used VHS film adaptation, kept hidden from his father, and one thing led to another—as subversive

  • Words:
    Laura Waddell
  • Photograph:
    Carl Van Vechten, © The Anais Nin Trust

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  • Words:
    Laura Waddell
  • Photograph:
    Carl Van Vechten, © The Anais Nin Trust
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