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The novelist discusses memory, our need for community and why art matters.

The work of Siri Hustvedt—novelist, critic, poet, and lecturer on psychiatry at Cornell’s Weill Medical School—is concerned with imprecision, the discomforting and the unknowable. “There is something alienating about perfection, ” she writes in her latest book, A Woman Looking at Men Looking at Women: Essays on Art, Sex, and the Mind. Many thinkers are intent on ignoring the fact that we are all flawed bodies who forget, grow and change—producing a range of emotions that are never constant because

  • Words:
    Charles Shafaieh
  • Photograph:
    Marion Ettlinger/ Contour/Getty Images

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  • Words:
    Charles Shafaieh
  • Photograph:
    Marion Ettlinger/ Contour/Getty Images
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