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Bread may be a staple food here on Earth but can be a life-threatening hazard in space.

“Crumbs are a huge issue, ” explains Sebastian Marcu, co-founder of Bake in Space—a German company aiming to make bread that can be consumed in the cosmos. “On Earth, crumbs will land in your toaster tray. But in microgravity, they fly around with no way to contain them.” Midway into the flight of Gemini 3 in 1965, American astronaut John Young discovered the potential danger when he pulled out a corned beef sandwich that he had smuggled aboard (perhaps it

  • Words:
    Molly Mandell
  • Photograph:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Styling:
    Lucy-Ruth Hathaway

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  • Words:
    Molly Mandell
  • Photograph:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Styling:
    Lucy-Ruth Hathaway
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