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Good business isn’t always about financials and selling products: These social enterprises inspire us to give more to our communities and take less.

In our special section on Community Entrepreneurs, we focus on makers, store owners, food enthusiasts, do-gooders, connectors, online communities, renters, lenders and educators who build and strengthen communities while making excellent goods and services.

Detroit Soup Amy Kaherl helps get local businesses off the ground through a combination of public support and hearty soups. A hot meal and a good conversation are powerful tools for igniting a community. As the leader of Detroit Soup, a micro-grant project that’s given more than $80, 000 to the revival of the once-bankrupt city, Amy Kaherl knows this concept well. “We felt we could empower and connect the community, ” she says. Every month, Detroit Soup

  • Words:
    Sarah Rowland, Sammi Massey, Alyx Gorman and Georgia Frances King
  • Illustration:
    Sarah Maycock

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  • Words:
    Sarah Rowland, Sammi Massey, Alyx Gorman and Georgia Frances King
  • Illustration:
    Sarah Maycock
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