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Miniature objects have little to offer but their charm.

Impossibly small and intricate—and often startlingly expensive—miniatures serve no practical function beyond the feat of their tiny, minutely detailed existence. Yet they remain pleasing objets d’art for professional collectors and dabblers alike, markets to which the Vitra Design Museum has been uniquely attuned. The museum is renowned for its iconic chair collection and offers a trip through seating history, from Michael Thonet to Arne Jacobsen and Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec. For more than two decades Vitra has been producing replicas at exactly one-sixth of the original size so that connoisseurs can curate their own mini home seating displays. Among the models are Marcel Breuer’s Wassily Chair (top), designed in 1925, Frank Lloyd Wright’s Taliesin West Chair (middle), first produced in 1946, and Grete Jalk’s 1963 GJ Bow Chair (bottom).

  • Words:
    Molly Mandell
  • Photography:
    Courtesy of Vitra
  • Words:
    Molly Mandell
  • Photography:
    Courtesy of Vitra
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