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Aristotle said that the whole is greater than the sum of its parts, but that didn’t stop Los Angeles photographer Justin Fantl from spending some time slicing and dicing common objects to see what he could discern from their core components.

Synecdoche is one of those half-remembered words that conjures memories of our high school English classrooms where we first learned to use juxtaposition correctly in a sentence. But unlike fancy words that serve to plump our linguistic egos, synecdoche strips stuff down to the foundations of what something really is: a smaller part representing the whole. A set of wheels references the whole car, not just the rounds it rolls on, and a crown can represent not just a king

  • Words:
    Georgia Frances King
  • Photography:
    Justin Fantl

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  • Words:
    Georgia Frances King
  • Photography:
    Justin Fantl
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