• No products in the cart.
cart chevron-down close-disc
:

More commonly known as the fear of holes, trypophobia is a word with both its etymology and experience rooted in the recesses of the internet.

Etymology: From trýpa meaning “drilling holes” and phobos meaning “fear”.

Meaning: As with other phobias, trypophobia refers to an irrational fear—in this case, an anxiety or revulsion induced by holes, bumps or pockmarks clustered together. Barnacles, sponges and aerated soap foam are known stimulants of trypophobia. Other triggers include skin lesions and cheese graters, which bring on symptoms such as dread, itchiness and hot sweat.

  • Words:
    John Clifford Burns
  • Photography:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Set Design:
    Maya Angeli and Aliki Kirmitsi

This story appears in a print issue of Kinfolk. You’re welcome to read three stories from each print issue of Kinfolk for free. To continue reading this story, click here.

If you'd like to enjoy unlimited access to our online archive, subscribe here. If you’re already a subscriber, please sign in.

Alternatively, keep browsing Kinfolk.com to enjoy more free content.

  • Words:
    John Clifford Burns
  • Photography:
    Aaron Tilley
  • Set Design:
    Maya Angeli and Aliki Kirmitsi
Related Stories

With rain beating against our windows, going inside for some physical recreation may be safer than slipping on a sidewalk, even if it involves swords.