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An excuse to buy the books you won’t read.

Etymology: The Japanese word tsundoku (積ん読) merges the kanji for tsunde oku, “to let something pile up,” and doku, “to read.” The hybrid term was something of a rhymed pun when it first appeared in print in the late 19th century. It can be translated loosely as “to buy reading materials and let them pile up.”

Meaning: Tsundoku carries no pejorative sense in Japanese. Rather it connotes a cheerful whimsy: wobbly towers of unread books, each containing an unknown world.

  • Words:
    Asher Ross
  • Photograph:
    Julien Oppenheim
  • Installation:
    La Bibliothèque by Pierre Yovanovitch

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  • Words:
    Asher Ross
  • Photograph:
    Julien Oppenheim
  • Installation:
    La Bibliothèque by Pierre Yovanovitch
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