• No products in the basket.
cart chevron-down close-disc
:

Behind great art, great bottoms.

While we can justly bemoan how smartphones, computers and other screens have contributed to flattening our lived experience of the world, flatness has long been associated with how we experience art. Though this is inevitable when engaging with paintings and photographs, almost all objects in museums and galleries are kept behind glass, cordoned off or placed in such a way so that we can only see them on a single plane and from limited vantage points.

Bernini’s sculpture Apollo and Daphne was never intended as an exception to this convention as it was originally placed in the corner of a room, but it realizes its dramatic potential now that it can be seen in the round at Rome’s Galleria Borghese. Like the passage that inspired it from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, in which a young maiden turns into a tree while the gods pursue her, the 17th-century marble sculpture, though static, conveys a narrative rather than a

  • Words:
    Charles Shafaieh
  • Photograph:
    Jorge Perez Ortiz

This story appears in a print issue of Kinfolk. You’re welcome to read three stories from each print issue of Kinfolk for free. To continue reading this story, click here.

If you'd like to enjoy unlimited access to our online archive, subscribe here. If you’re already a subscriber, please sign in.

Alternatively, keep browsing Kinfolk.com to enjoy more free content.

  • Words:
    Charles Shafaieh
  • Photograph:
    Jorge Perez Ortiz
Related Stories

Harriet Fitch Little rounds up a selection of podcasts that set out to disprove Edgar Allan Poe's claim of sleep being "little slices of death."

Swedish musician Jens Lekman reflects on the five-year hiatus leading up to his new album, existentialism in music and the elusive nature of his work.